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ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

English I or English I Pre-AP: Introduction to Literature and Composition
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: none

Students will study literature and sharpen reading, writing, and language skills. Students read literature from around the world, including the following genres: short story, poetry, memoir, autobiography, drama, and epic. They read examples of informational writing, such as a letter, Web site, magazine article, newspaper article, speech, editorial, and movie or book review. Along the way, they acquire and practice reading skills and strategies that are directly applicable to these literary and informational reading materials. In addition, students develop and practice writing and language skills. They employ the writing process to create narrative, expository, and persuasive compositions. This course will have 70-90 hours of instruction per semester

English I Pre-AP includes the same content as above at a more enriched level and adds how to create and evaluate media presentations and oral presentations and to fine-tune listening skills. The Pre-AP course will have 90-120 hours of instruction per semester.
 

English II or English II Pre-AP: Critical Reading and Effective Writing
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: English I or English Pre-AP
This course builds on English I and English I Pre-AP by developing both academic and life skills. Literary selections include short fiction and poetry from around the globe, modern drama works, and a contemporary novel. Nonfiction selections feature historical correspondence, diaries, logs, and famous courtroom arguments. Life reading skills target forms, applications, and work-related communication. Grammar review and vocabulary development are included in every unit. Summaries and annotations support fluency and comprehension of all reading material. The writing program builds confidence in young writers by targeting control of organization, effective sentences, and word choice. The course consists of 70-90 hours of instruction per semester.
The Pre-AP course adds Shakespearean drama and more complex reading strategies that require students to question, predict, clarify and evaluate ideas presented in the texts. Students must complete rigorous grammar reviews and vocabulary development exercises in every unit. The Pre-AP course consists of 90-120 hours of instruction per semester.

English III or English III Honors: American Literature
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: English I, II or English I Pre-AP, English II Pre-AP

This literature and composition course is a survey of American literature. The course builds literary and communication skills, including reading, writing, language appreciation and aesthetics, listening and speaking, viewing and representing, and research. Special emphasis is placed on writing expository, research, and creative compositions; honing critical and analytic skills through close readings of literary, historical, expository, and functional documents; using context strategies and an understanding of etymology to build vocabulary; and practicing communication skills. Reading selections cover a variety of genres and voices in American literature and expository prose. Students learn and practice workplace communication skills in special activities and they practice gathering, evaluating, synthesizing, presenting, and documenting information in a unit dedicated to writing research reports. The course provides 70-90 hours of instruction per semester.
English III Pre-AP provides a deeper immersion of the topics listed above and adds practicing communication skills in online discussions. Students are encouraged to respond critically and personally to the works they read and to use them as a context for thinking about the unique and universal aspects of culture. The Pre-AP course consists of 90-120 hours of instruction per semester.

English III AP Advanced Placement English Language
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: English I, II or English I Pre-AP, English II Pre-AP

In AP English Language and Composition, students learn to understand and analyze complex styles of writing by reading works by many authors. Students explore the richness of language, including syntax, imitation, word choice, and tone. They also learn about their own composition style and process, starting with exploration, planning, and writing, and continuing through editing, peer review, rewriting, polishing, and applying what they learn to a breadth of academic, personal, and professional contexts. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, this course prepares students for the AP Exam and for further study in communications, creative writing, journalism, literature, and composition. Students receive 120-150 hours of instruction per semester. Students will be required to purchase texts for this course and must take the AP exam for which there is a fee. Required texts for this course cost approximately $100.

English IV or English IV Honors: British and World Literature
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: English I, II, III or the Pre-AP/AP versions of English I, II, and III
Dual credit option: ENGL 1311 Composition I and ENGL 1312 Composition II
British and World Literature is a survey of British literature that illustrates the origins of English-language literature and reflects its reach beyond the British Isles. The course emphasizes six core areas: reading, writing, language (appreciation and aesthetics), listening and speaking, viewing and representing (including media literacy), and research. The course gives students meaningful practice in fundamental literacy skills while introducing them to classics of British and world literature. Students are encouraged to think and respond independently, critically, and creatively to the subject matter, whether it is a work of literature, a piece of nonfiction writing, or a media work. This course includes 70-90 hours of instruction per semester.
British and World Literature Honors includes the material above but requires more writing and more complex analysis of the material. The course will include 90-120 hours of instruction per semester.

English IV AP English Literature and Composition
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: English I, II, III or the Pre-AP/AP version of English I, II, and III
Students immerse themselves in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. They will read and write daily, using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and class discussions to assess and improve their skills and knowledge. The course places special emphasis on reading comprehension, structural and critical analysis of written works, literary vocabulary, and recognizing and understanding literary devices. Students will receive 120-150 hours of instruction per semester. Students must take the AP exam and pay a fee of approximately $80 for this exam. Texts required for this course cost approximately $200.

Creative Writing
Credit – ½ credit
Prerequisite: none
This course introduces the student to poetry and prose writing. The focus is on the creative process, including an analysis and discussion of a variety of published works. This course is not available in 2010-2011.

Speech
Credit – ½ credit
Prerequisite: none
Dual Credit Option: For 11th and 12 grade students: SPCH 2341 Business and Professional Communication

This course seeks to introduce students to the essential elements of effective public speaking through discussion and application. Students will develop both speaking and listening skills, while learning how to communicate effectively. Students are required to deliver various types of speeches throughout the course of this class. The successful student will leave this class with an improved ability to organize thoughts and present them with verbal fluency to audiences of various compositions. This course will be available beginning in 2012-2013.
 

FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT

Masterworks of World Art
Credit – ½ credit
Prerequisite: none
Masterworks of World Art is a survey of the history of Western visual arts, with a primary focus on painting. Students begin with an introduction to the basic principles of painting and learn how to critique and compare works of art. Students then explore prehistoric and early Greek and Roman art before they move on to the Middle Ages. Emphasis is placed on the Renaissance and the principles and masters that emerged in Italy and northern Europe. Students end their art tour with the United States during the 20th century, a time of great innovation as abstract art took center stage. While Western art is the course’s primary focus, students will also be exposed to art of Asia and the Americas. Coverage of each artistic movement highlights historical context and introduces students to key artists that represent a variety of geographic locations. Throughout the course, students apply what they have learned about art critique to analyze and evaluate both individual artists and individual works of art. Students will receive 70-90 hours of instruction.

Music Appreciation
Credit – ½ to 1 credit
Prerequisite: none

Music Appreciation introduces student to the history, theory, and genres of music, from the most primitive surviving examples, through the classical to the most contemporary in the world at large. The first semester covers primitive musical forms, classical music, and American jazz. The second semester presents the rich modern traditions, including: gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip-hop. The course explores the interface of music and social movements and examines how the emergent global society and the Internet are bringing musical forms together in new ways from all around the world. Students complete a listening practicum throughout the course. The listening practicum requires students to listen to a variety of music genres and comment and parents or guardians must validate their children’s regular participation in the listening practicum. The students will receive 70-90 hours of instruction per semester.
 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT

Spanish I or Spanish I Pre-AP
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: none
The Spanish I course teaches students to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as home life, occupations, travel, and medicine. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the structures and uses of present-tense verb forms, imperatives, adjective agreement, impersonal constructions, formal and informal address, and reflexive verbs. Students explore words used in different Spanish-speaking regions and learn about the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries and regions within and outside Europe. There are 70-90 hours of instruction per semester. Students must have a microphone and a Spanish-English dictionary.

Spanish I Pre-AP students learn the same material as above in greater depth and add study of the past tense. There are 90-120 hours of instruction per semester. Students must have a microphone and Spanish-English dictionary.

Spanish II or Spanish II Pre-AP
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: Spanish I or Spanish I Pre-AP
Building on Spanish I concepts, Spanish II students learn to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives - both in formal and informal situations. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Students expand their vocabulary in topics such as cooking, ecology, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes a review of present-tense verb forms, an introduction to the past tense, the conditional mood, imperatives, impersonal constructions, and reported speech. Students deepen their knowledge of Spanish-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues. There are 70-90 hours of instruction per semester. Students must have a microphone and Spanish-English dictionary.

Spanish II Pre-AP encompasses the same topics as above but includes a more intense grammatical study of verb forms, tenses, moods and uses, impersonal constructions, and reported speech. Students also are encouraged to consult materials outside the course, such as Web links, community resources, or other media, to better understand Spanish-speaking culture and people. There are 90-120 hours of instruction per semester. Students must have a microphone and Spanish-English dictionary.

Spanish III
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: Spanish II or Spanish II Pre-AP

The course includes practice of functional expressions, vocabulary, and grammar structures interwoven with cultural information also allows for instruction in a variety of teaching and learning styles. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing in the language.

Spanish IV AP Spanish Language
Credit-1
Prerequisite: Spanish III or Spanish III Pre-AP

In AP Spanish Language students practice their Spanish speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills daily. They study vocabulary, grammar, and cultural aspects of the language, and then apply what they’ve learned in extensive written and spoken exercises. By the end of the course, students will have an expansive vocabulary and a solid, working knowledge of all verb forms and tenses. Students will receive 120-150 hours of instruction per semester. Students must take the AP exam and pay a fee of approximately $80 for this exam. Students must have a microphone.
 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT

Algebra I or Algebra I Pre-AP
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: none

This course is designed as an introduction to algebra skills with emphasis on fundamentals, the solution of equations, and the application of equations to everyday problems. Course topics include an Introductory Algebra review; measurement; an introduction to functions; problem solving with functions; graphing; linear equations and systems of linear equations; polynomials and factoring; and data analysis and probability. The course includes 70-90 hours of instruction per semester.

Algebra I Pre-AP provides a more rigorous analysis of the topics in Algebra I and is designed to have students solve higher order thinking problems and develop extensions of the regular course. The course includes 90-120 hours of instruction per semester.

Geometry or Geometry Pre-AP
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I or Algebra I Pre-AP

Geometry is the development of deductive and inductive reasoning through proofs. By using definitions, and undefined terms, students learn to reason effectively. It is our intent to help the student answer the question “why?” Course topics include reasoning, proof, and the creation of a sound mathematical argument; points, lines, and angles; triangles; quadrilaterals and other polygons; circles; coordinate geometry; and three-dimensional solids. The course concludes with a look at special topics in geometry, such as constructions, symmetry, tessellations, fractals, and non-Euclidean geometry. Students receive 70-90 hours of instruction per semester.

Geometry Pre-AP addresses the same topics as Geometry, but does so in more depth with greater emphasis on reasoning and problem solving. Students receive 90-120 hours of instruction per semester.

Algebra II or Algebra II Pre-AP
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I or Algebra I Pre-AP, Geometry or Geometry Pre-AP

Algebra II is a course that will expand upon what was learned in Algebra I. Course topics include conic sections; functions, relations, and their graphs; quadratic functions; inverse functions; and advanced polynomial functions. Students also cover topics relating to rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions; sequences and series; and data analysis and probability. Students receive 70-90 hours of instruction per semester.

Algebra II Pre-AP addresses the same topics as Algebra II, but does so in more depth with greater emphasis on reasoning and problem solving. Students receive 90-120 hours of instruction per semester.

Precalculus or Precalculus Pre-AP
Credit –1 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II (recommendation of Algebra II teacher) or the Pre-AP  versions of Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II

The first semester includes linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions; systems of equations; and conic sections. The second semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and laws of cosine and sine; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers. Students receive 70-90 hours of instruction per semester. Student must have a TI-83 or 84 calculator for this course.
Precalculus Pre-AP addresses the same topics as Precalculus, but does so in more depth with greater emphasis on reasoning and problem solving. Students receive 90-120 hours of instruction per semester.

Probability and Statistics
Credit: .5
Prerequisite: Algebra II or Algebra II Pre-AP: Grade 11 or 12

Probability and Statistics provides a curriculum focused on understanding key data analysis and probabilistic concepts, calculations, and relevance to real-world applications.  Through a "Discovery-Confirmation-Practice"-based exploration of each concept, students learn topics such as types of data; common methods used to collect data; and the various representations of data, including histograms, bar graphs, box plots, and scatterplots. Students learn to work with data by analyzing and employing methods of prediction, specifically involving samples and populations, distributions, summary statistics, regression analysis, transformations, simulations, and inference.  Ideas involving probability, - including sample space, empirical and theoretical probability, expected value, and independent and compound events - are covered as students explore the relationship between probability and data analysis. The connection between geometry and probability is explored through basic geometric probability.  Students receive 70 - 90 hours of instruction and must have a TI-83 or 84 calculator for this course.

Calculus AB AP
Credit - 1
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus Pre-AP; Grade 12; Teacher recommendation

This course is designed for students with a strong background in college preparatory mathematics. Topics include analysis of functions, graphs, concepts and skills of limits, derivatives and integrals. Handheld calculators (TI-84 or 83) are required to understand mathematical models and solve equations. Students learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Instead of simply getting the right answer, students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and to apply mathematical reasoning to real-world models. Students receive 120-150 hours per semester. Students are required to take the AP exam and must pay a fee of approximately $80 for the exam. An optional text is recommended, cost is approximately $48 (rent)-$180 (buy).

Statistics AP
Credit - 1
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus Pre-AP; Grade 12; Teacher Recommendation
Dual credit option: MATH 2303 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (1/2 credit only)

This course provides a study of probability and gives students the opportunity to collect, analyze, interpret, and display quantitative data. Handheld calculators (TI-84 or 83) are required to understand mathematical models and solve equations. Students learn to effectively design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating real research examples taken from daily life. The next time they hear the results from another poll or study, they will know whether the results are valid. Students receive 120-150 hours of instruction per semester. At the end of this course, all students will be required to take the Advanced Placement Examination with a fee of approximately $80. Optional texts cost approximately $75 (rent)-$175 (buy).


RELIGION DEPARTMENT

Religion I: Jesus Christ and Scripture
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: none – freshman or sophomore level class
Dual credit option if junior or senior: RELS 1310 Introduction to Theology and RELS 1345 Biblical Themes

First year religion is focused on Jesus Christ, his teachings, and the New Testament.

Religion II: HIstory of the Catholic Church and World Religions
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  successful completion of Religion I or a dual credit course
Dual credit option: RELS 2345 World Religions and RELS 1360 Christian Ethics

This course examines the history of the Catholic Church and the beliefs, culture, sacred texts and religious views of various world religions. Emphasis is also made in regard to inter-religious dialogue, church documents of ecumenism and religious experiences in various houses of worship.
 

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

Biology I or Biology I Pre-AP
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: none

Biology focuses on the mastery of basic biological concepts and models while building scientific inquiry skills and exploring the connections between living things and their environment. The course begins with an introduction to the nature of science and biology, including the major themes of structure and function, matter and energy flow, systems, and interconnectedness of life. Students then apply those themes to the structure and function of the cell, cellular metabolism, and biogeochemical cycles. Students explore the connections and interactions between living things by studying genetics, ecosystems and natural selection, and evolution. The course ends with an applied look at human biology. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science. Dry labs will be used; students will complete 70-90 hours of instruction per semester.

Biology Pre-AP is an in-depth course that furthers mastery of scientific skills, fosters a deep understanding of key concepts, and promotes the application of the scientific method to biological topics. In addition to the topics above, the course asks students to respond to scientific problems and issues via written assignments. Moreover, exploration activities challenge Honors students to deconstruct scientific claims, analyze scientific articles, and suggest follow-up experiments or topics for further research. Students will complete 90-120 hours of instruction per semester.

Physics
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisites: Biology I or Biology I Pre-AP

Topics include motion, forces, energy sound and wave motion, atomic structure, electricity and magnetism, light and optics. The topics will be studied with an emphasis on theory which will require a proficiency in algebra as well as a working knowledge of trigonometry and/or pre-calculus. Students will gain an understanding of physics’ core principles and then apply them to problem-solving exercises. There are 70-90 hours of instruction per semester. Students must have a graphing calculator (TI-83 or TI-84). This course requires the purchase of a lab kit (approximately $200) or access to supervised lab facilities. Use of the lab kit at home requires adult supervision.

Chemistry I or Chemistry I Pre-AP
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: Biology I or Biology I Pre-AP; Algebra I or Algebra I Pre-AP
This course is designed to give the student experiences in basic chemistry. Chemistry offers a curriculum that facilitates students' understanding of chemistry concepts and critical scientific skills. Topics include the nature of matter; the structure of atoms and molecules; bond formations; the qualitative and quantitative aspects of chemical reactivity; the physical and chemical properties of solids, liquids, and gases; the states of matter; phase transitions; equilibrium; kinetics; thermodynamics; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry; and an introduction to organic chemistry. Dry labs will be used. There are 70-90 hours of instruction per semester.

Chemistry Pre-AP is a rigorous course that begins with an overview of chemistry concepts and critical scientific skills. Students then extend their knowledge by applying the scientific method. They are encouraged to look at chemistry from both personal and worldly perspectives and to analyze the social implications of the topics covered. Topics covered are the same as those above, but are studied in greater depth. There are 90-120 hours of instruction per semester.

Chemistry II AP
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: Chemistry I and Algebra II or the Pre-AP versions of these courses.

This course is an extension of Chemistry I and emphasizes laboratory skills and techniques, formation of hypotheses and conclusions, and reasoning and problem solving. AP Chemistry builds students’ understanding of the nature and reactivity of matter. After studying the structure of atoms, molecules, and ions, students move on to solve quantitative chemical problems and explore how molecular structure relates to chemical and physical properties. Students will examine the molecular composition of common substances and learn to predictably transform them through chemical reactions. Dry labs will be used unless the student has access to a supervised lab; students must have a graphing calculator (TI-83 or TI-84). Note: The College Board has only conditionally approved the dry lab version of AP Chemistry. Students receive 120-150 hours of instruction per semester. Students are required to take the AP Exam; there is a fee for this exam; optional text costs approximately $59 (rent)-$175 (buy).

Earth Science or Earth Science Honors
Credit—1 credit
Prerequisite: Biology, Physics, Chemistry or the Pre-AP version of these courses; 12th grade

Earth Science offers a focused curriculum that explores Earth's composition, structure, processes, and history; its atmosphere, freshwater, and oceans; and its environment in space. Topics include an exploration of the major cycles that affect every aspect of life, including weather, climate, air movement, tectonics, volcanic eruptions, rocks, minerals, geologic history, Earth's environment, sustainability, and energy resources. Students receive 70-90 hours of instruction per semester.

Earth Science Honors covers the same material as Earth Science but does so in more depth with more inquiry and lab activities. Students receive 90-120 hours of instruction each semester.
 

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT

World History or World History Pre-AP
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: none
World History covers major events in world history, including the development and influence of human-geographic relationships, political and social structures, economics, science and technology, and the arts. Students investigate the major religions and belief systems throughout history and learn about the importance of trade and cultural exchange. Other topics include the development of agriculture, the spread of democracy, the rise of nation-states, the industrial era, the spread of imperialism, and the issues and conflicts of the 20th century. Students learn to use primary historical documents as evidence as they learn about past events. Students develop confidence in their analytic writing through a sequence of short analytic pieces and short essays, including document-based questions. Primary documents are embedded in the instruction to encourage students to make frequent connections to evidence from the past. There are 70-90 hours of instruction per semester in this course.

Pre-AP World History is a robust, writing-intensive course that traces the development of civilizations around the world from prehistory to the present. Students are encouraged to use their knowledge of critical points in history to develop their points of view and apply what they have learned to the promotion of civic action in a rapidly globalizing world. Topics are the same as in the course above but are more extensive in content and there are 90-12 hours of instruction in the course each semester.

World Geography
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: none

This Geography course examines a broad range of geographical perspectives covering all the major regions of the world. Each region is under review in a similar structure in order for students to more clearly see the similarities and differences between each. Specifically, the course will explore where each region is located, its physical characteristics, climate, and significant geographical features. The exploration will then continue by looking at each region from a cultural, economic, and political perspective, closely examining the human impact on each region.

United States History or United States History Honors
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: World History or World History Pre-AP and World Geography
Dual credit option: HIST 1321 The United States to 1865 and HIST 1322 The United States
Since 1865

This course traces the nation's history from the end of the Civil War to the present. It describes the emergence of the United States as an industrial nation, highlighting social policy as well as its role in modern world affairs. Students evaluate the attempts to bind the nation together during Reconstruction while also exploring the growth of an industrial economy. Moving into the 20th and 21st centuries, students probe the economic and diplomatic interactions between the United States and other world players while investigating how the world wars, the Cold War, and the "information revolution" affected the lives of ordinary Americans. Woven through this chronological sequence is a strong focus on the changing conditions of women, African Americans, and other minority groups. The course emphasizes the development of historical analysis skills such as comparing and contrasting, differentiating between facts and interpretations, considering multiple perspectives, and analyzing cause-and-effect relationships. These skills are applied to text interpretation and in written assignments that guide learners step-by-step through problem-solving activities. Students receive 70-90 hours of instruction per semester.

United States History Honors covers the same material as above; however, the course requires students to perfect their ability to use logic and evidence to create persuasive written arguments in five-paragraph essays and in shorter exercises such as document-based questions and analytic discussions. Students receive 90-120 hours of instruction per semester.

United States History AP
Credit-1 credit
Prerequisite: World History and World Geography

United States History AP analyzes and explores the economic, political, and social changes in America since Columbus. Students master historical knowledge and critical analysis, build reading, writing, and communication skills, and discover how historical events have contributed to American culture. In the process, they’ll learn how decisions and events of the past continue to have profound effects on the world today and how knowledge of the causes behind past events can influence future decisions. By the end of the course, students will be ready to put their factual knowledge to work by weighing evidence and interpreting problems presented by historians. Students receive 120-150 hours of instruction per semester. Students must take the AP exam for which there is a fee of approximately $80. Required texts for this course cost approximately $29 (rent)-$80 (buy).

American Government or American Government Honors
Credit – ½ credit
Prerequisite: 12th Grade; World Geography and either the core of Pre-AP/AP versions of United States History, and  World History .

American Government uses the perspective of political institutions to explore the history, organization, and functions of the U.S. government. Beginning with basic theories of government, moving to the Declaration of Independence, and continuing to the present day, the course explores the relationship between individual Americans and the governing bodies. It covers the political culture of the country and gains insight into the challenges faced by presidents, congressional representatives, and other political activists. It also covers the roles of political parties, interest groups, the media, and the Supreme Court. Students perfect their analytic writing through a series of analytic assignments and written lesson tests. Students read annotated primary documents and apply those documents to the course content. Students receive 70-90 hours of instruction.

American Government Honors covers the same material as above, but requires frequent close readings of primary documents and applying those documents to the course content. Students receive 90-120 hours of instruction.

U.S. Government and Politics AP
Credit – ½ credit
Prerequisite: 12th Grade; World Geography, and either the core or Pre-AP/AP versions of United States History and World History

U.S. Government and Politics AP studies the operations and structure of the U.S. government and the behavior of the electorate and politicians. Students will gain the analytic perspective necessary to critically evaluate political data, hypotheses, concepts, opinions, and processes. Along the way, they will learn how to gather data about political behavior and develop their own theoretical analysis of American politics. They will also build the skills they need to examine general propositions about government and politics, and to analyze the specific relationships between political, social, and economic institutions. Students receive 120-150 hours of instruction. Students must take the AP exam for which there is a fee of approximately $80. Required texts for this course cost approximately $51 (rent)-$120 (buy).

Economics or Economics Honors
Credit – ½ credit
Prerequisite: 12th Grade;  World Geography and either the core or Pre-AP/AP versions of United States History and World History
Dual credit option: ECON 2301Macroeconomics

Economics provides an introduction to key economic principles. The course covers fundamental properties of economics, including an examination of markets from both historical and current perspectives; the basics of supply and demand; the theories of early economic philosophers such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo; theories of value; the concept of money and how it evolved; the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve; Keynesian economics; the productivity, wages, investment, and growth involved in capitalism; unemployment, inflations, and the national debt; and a survey of markets in areas such as China, Europe, and the Middle East. Students perfect their analytic writing through a series of analytic assignments and written lesson tests. They also apply basic mathematics to economic concepts. Students read selections from annotated primary documents and apply those readings to the course content. Students receive 70-90 hours of instruction.

Economics Honors includes the same topics as above but also allows students to gain an understanding of choices they must make as producers, consumers, investors, and taxpayers. They have ample opportunity to develop their points of view and apply what they learn to the promotion of civic action. Considerably more reading and writing is required in the honors course. Students receive 90-120 hours of instruction.

Macroeconomics AP
Credit-½ credit
Prerequisite: 12th Grade; World Geography and either the core or Pre-AP/AP versions of United States History and World History

Macroeconomics AP students learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify trends in the economy, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. They will also examine how individuals, institutions, and influences affect people, and how those factors can impact everyone’s life through employment rates, government spending, inflation, taxes, and production. Students receive 120-150 hours of instruction. Students must take the AP exam for which there is a fee of approximately $80. Required texts for this course cost approximately $46 (rent)-$135 (buy).

Microeconomics AP
Credit-½ credit
Prerequisite: 12th Grade; World Geography and either the core or Pre-AP/AP versions of United States History and, World History

Microeconomics AP studies the behavior of individuals and businesses as they exchange goods and services in the marketplace. Students will learn why the same product costs different amounts at different stores, in different cities, at different times. Students also learn to spot patterns in economic behavior and how to use those patterns to explain buyer and seller behavior under various conditions. Microeconomics studies the economic way of thinking, understanding the nature and function of markets, the role of scarcity and competition, the influence of factors such as interest rates on business decisions, and the role of government in promoting a healthy economy. Students receive 120-150 hours of instruction. Students must take the AP exam for which there is a fee of approximately $80. Required texts for this course cost approximately $48 (rent)-$155 (buy).

Psychology
Credit – ½ credit
Prerequisite: 11th or 12th grade
Dual credit option: PSYCH 1301 Introduction to Psychology

Psychology provides a solid overview of the field’s major domains: methods, biopsychology, cognitive and developmental psychology, and variations in individual and group behavior.
By focusing on significant scientific research and on the questions that are most important to psychologists, students see psychology as an evolving science. Each topic clusters on challenging questions, such as “What is happiness?” Students answer these questions before, during, and after they interact with direct instruction. Students learn about all the domains the American Psychological Association (APA) emphasizes: methods, biopsychology, cognitive and developmental psychology, and variations in individual and group behavior. Students receive 70-90 hours of instruction.

Psychology AP
Credit – ½ credit
Prerequisite: 11th or 12th grade and Biology or Biology Honors

Psychology AP provides an overview of current psychological research methods and theories. Students will explore the therapies used by professional counselors and clinical psychologists and examine the reasons for normal human reactions: how people learn and think, the process of human development and human aggression, altruism, intimacy, and self-reflection. Students study core psychological concepts, such as the brain and sense functions, and learn to gauge human reactions, gather information, and form meaningful syntheses. Along the way, students will also investigate relevant concepts like study skills and information retention. Students receive 120-150 hours of instruction. Students must take the AP exam for which there is a fee of approximately $80. Required texts for this course cost approximately $47 (rent)-$130 (buy).

Sociology 1311 Introduction to Sociology-Dual Credit only
Credit – ½ credit
Prerequisite: 11th or 12th grade

This course studies the structure and function of social groups, basic sociological concepts, social problems and how they relate to human behavior. Students will discuss characteristics of social groups, relationships, cultural growth and change as well as personal social life experiences. Students will develop an awareness of how social problems and society in general relate to their individual lives.
 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

PE – Non-athletic and athletic
Credit – ½- 1 credit
Prerequisite: none

The ½ credit non-athletic physical education course combines online instruction with actual student participation in weekly cardiovascular, aerobic, and muscle toning activities. The course promotes a keen understanding of the value of physical fitness and aims to motivate students to participate in physical activities throughout their lives. Specific areas of study include: Cardiovascular exercise and care, safe exercising, building muscle strength and endurance, injury prevention, fitness skills and FITT benchmarks, goal setting, nutrition and diet (vitamins and minerals, food labels, evaluation product claims), and stress management. The course requires routine participation in adult-supervised physical activities. Successful completion of this course will require parent/legal guardian sign-off on student-selected physical activities and on weekly participation reports to verify the student is meeting his or her requirements and responsibilities.

A second ½ credit may be earned by participating in either a sport or outside athletic activity. Credit will be based on a signed activity log that must reflect at least 70 hours of activity within one semester (16 weeks).

CAPSTONE  PROJECT

Senior Independent Project (SIP)
Credit – 1 credit
Prerequisite: Student must have senior standing

Community service is an important part of the UIW Prep experience. In the year-long Senior Independent Study Project students will work with a mentor to develop a project based on a student’s community service work or related to a specific academic discipline. During the first semester students will spend time doing literature research, selecting a topic, working with their mentor to focus the topic, and beginning research. During the second semester students will complete their research and then write a paper and present their findings to the UIW Prep Community on Brainpower Island in Second Life or through a video.

Note:  Dual Credit courses are held in 8-week terms that may not match UIW Prep term dates.  Please see your adviser for specific dates.

Class is Starting!

UIW Prep has 9 session starts per year. Summer II session starts June 30. Registration deadline is June 13. Take one class or a full course load. See a class demo or apply today!

Summer School

Get ahead this summer with UIW Prep's 100% online summer sessions starting in June. Registration deadline is June 13.

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Dual Credit Courses

We offer dual credit courses within our curriculum at no additional expense. All classes are taught by university-credentialed faculty. Graduates can earn up to 30 credit hours.

Partnership

Partner with UIW Prep so your school can supplement your current offerings and increase student retention by providing advanced placement and dual credit classes using the latest online learning tools!